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  #1  
Old 07-03-2021, 12:53 PM
uk_figs's Avatar
uk_figs uk_figs is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Tulsa, OK
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Default Brake flange movement

I noticed recently that my right wheel pant had a small amount of fore/aft rotation movement, in disassembling the wheel/brake I found that the brake flange that is bolted to the axle has a very small amount of movement which is amplified by the length of the wheel pant.
It looks like the allen head bolt is moving with the flange suggesting the hole through the axle maybe wallered out (or the bolt is worn).
Anyone come across this and have a fix? I plan to fully remove the flange to check and I believe (according to the drawing) the allen bolt is 5/16, is it possible to ream the hole to the next size (3/8) without taking the entire gear leg apart and off the plane (I have a set of chuck reamers).
RV-7 650 hours.
Thanks
Figs
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  #2  
Old 07-03-2021, 02:16 PM
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Location: Georgetown, TX
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Default

I found a similar issue, too much wiggle, collar wasn't tight. In my case the hole wasn't wallowed out, but the shoulder screw + nut couldn't be tightened to correct torque values with the specified stackup from Van's as the nut would bottom out on the shoulder screw.

I added an additional AN960-516 washer under the screw head IIRC and re-torqued the Screw/Nut.
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  #3  
Old 07-07-2021, 07:17 AM
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Default Fixed

Brian
Exactly the issue now fixed.
Thanks
Figs
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  #4  
Old 07-07-2021, 12:47 PM
FinnFlyer FinnFlyer is offline
 
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Location: Bell, FL
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Default RV-3B

Same phenomena. Didn't look like any holes wallowed out, in my case the hole in flange just drilled too big. I guess the clamping force initially holds it, but doesn't last when routinely landing on grass strip.

Didn't feel like getting into reaming out the hole in the axle nor welding partially shut and redrilling the hole in the flange, so used a bit of shim stock to fill the excess space in the flange hole.

Now, a bit of JB-Weld comes to mind as a possible (more or less temporary solution).

Finn
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  #5  
Old 07-08-2021, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uk_figs View Post
Brian
Exactly the issue now fixed.
Thanks
Figs
Cool!!

Another cautionary tale dealing with power coated parts. On two different occasions, I found that the power coating will "give" or deform and then cause the torque to be less than required. I've taken to sanding off the powder coat that's under the bolt head/washer/nut and then torquing the assembly. Apply a light coat of vaseline or similar to provide a moisture barrier.

Cheers!
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