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  #1  
Old 01-20-2022, 07:04 AM
RNB RNB is offline
 
Join Date: Jul 2020
Location: Bethel NC (PGV)
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Default What type of rivets in a 10?

I am reading an EAA book on basic sheet metal work, going over different types of rivets. What rivet methods are used in a 10? I am mainly interested in learning if it is a method that is best done with two people and if so, how much time is dedicated to the actual riveting with two people? When placing such rivets, is there a fatigue factor that sets in?
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  #2  
Old 01-20-2022, 07:12 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Location: Tampa, FL
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Default

The 10 uses primarily AN426 and AN470 solid rivets that need to be either squeezed or bucked. The method used is irrelevant for the most part— sometimes you can use either method (I prefer to squeeze whenever I can), but a lot of times the situation dictates the method. As to whether you need 2 people is again driven by the situation. I drafted my wife and taught her to shoot while I bucked when necessary but I did as much riveting as I could solo.

There are also a fair amount of various styles of pulled rivets too.

I never got really fatigued when riveting, but I did find doing a lot of pulled rivets in a session with a manual hand puller (vs pneumatic) to be more tiring (especially in my hands) than anything I ever did with solid rivets. In the end it’s not an issue. If I were going to build a 12 I’d have invested in a pneumatic puller but a better investment for the 10, IMO, is pneumatic squeezer.
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Last edited by Auburntsts : 01-20-2022 at 07:23 AM.
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  #3  
Old 01-20-2022, 07:28 AM
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Auburntsts Auburntsts is offline
 
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Forgot to add that, IMO, riveting isnít a particularly hard skill to learn, it just takes a bit of practice.
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  #4  
Old 01-20-2022, 07:31 AM
AlpineYoda AlpineYoda is offline
 
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Above is absolutely right - but to add - maybe 95% are bucked. 5% are pulled.

As for particular technique, the vast majority of rivets are into dimpled or countersunk pieces, yielding the additional strength of the dimple. The back riveting technique often yields the most consistent results, assuming you have a nice plate or surface to back rivet into.
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  #5  
Old 01-20-2022, 07:34 AM
RV10Pilot RV10Pilot is offline
 
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Location: Medford, NJ USA
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There are very few tasks that require 2 people while building a RV-10. Over the 2000+ hours to build a 10 if you had 40 hours of a second person you would be fine and most of that time would be to move some of the larger parts.
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  #6  
Old 01-20-2022, 02:24 PM
DRMA DRMA is offline
 
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I found there were certain areas that required 2 people to drive the rivets, for example the bottom wing skins, and some of the tail cone rivets that weren't able to be reached by one person. But a lot of the work can be done by one person, particularly if close enough to an edge to allow use of a pneumatic squeezer.

There are also some pulled rivets, but as indicated above perhaps only 5% or less.

I typically worked 7-8 hrs at a time on my RV-10, and didn't get fatigued, but mostly used tools that reduced the forces required from me, such as pneumatic squeezer, pneumatic rivet puller, DRDT for dimpling, 5 inch random orbit sander for a lot of the fiberglass work, etc.

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  #7  
Old 01-20-2022, 03:30 PM
Martyrv6a Martyrv6a is offline
 
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Personally I found myself getting hand fatigue operating the Cleco pliers.
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  #8  
Old 01-20-2022, 03:42 PM
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wirejock wirejock is offline
 
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Location: Estes Park, CO
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Default Pounding rivets

Funny. This is exactly why I encourage Mentorship.
I prefer the gun and bar and rarely use my pneumatic.
Personal preference. It's all about what you like.

Consider the cleko pliers excercise. I love shaking hands with my grand daughters boyfriends. They always look at their hand. Old G-rent has quite a grip!
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  #9  
Old 01-20-2022, 05:14 PM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is offline
 
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Location: Sunman, IN
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Default Yeah, but...

Quote:
Originally Posted by wirejock View Post
Funny. This is exactly why I encourage Mentorship.
I prefer the gun and bar and rarely use my pneumatic.
Personal preference. It's all about what you like.

Consider the cleko pliers excercise. I love shaking hands with my grand daughters boyfriends. They always look at their hand. Old G-rent has quite a grip!
A word to the wise: Switch hands for the cleco pliers often or you may find yourself with a case of tendonitis. It is not pleasant.
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  #10  
Old 01-20-2022, 05:36 PM
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wirejock wirejock is offline
 
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Default Ambidextrous

Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketman1988 View Post
A word to the wise: Switch hands for the cleco pliers often or you may find yourself with a case of tendonitis. It is not pleasant.
It's sort of necessary. Builder has to learn all skills with either hand
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