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  #11  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:05 PM
rocketman1988 rocketman1988 is online now
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
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Default Clips?

A gun and two extra clips?…you must mean magazines…
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  #12  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:24 PM
F1R F1R is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rocketman1988 View Post
A gun and two extra clips?…you must mean magazines…
Don't be silly, the magazines can be used to start a fire or come handy if out of toilet paper
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  #13  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:25 PM
pat76cj pat76cj is offline
 
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Location: Western edge, Iowa
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FAA tv just had recent clip about it.

https://www.faa.gov/TV/?mediaId=470
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  #14  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:28 PM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Location: Boulder, CO
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Had a thought about architecture of the survival kit. Might be worth having two kinds. One would be the master one that would always be in the plane but would only really suffice for the pilot. The other would be an add-on that you'd carry when you had a passenger, with appropriate consumables and other necessary things for another person.

Dave
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  #15  
Old 01-06-2022, 07:29 PM
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bjdecker bjdecker is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaziza View Post
Hi Brian, What's a "shock Cord??"
I mis-spoke; paracord -- see https://www.paracordplanet.com/parac...SABEgKNv_D_BwE
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  #16  
Old 01-06-2022, 08:30 PM
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Ironflight Ironflight is offline
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Location: Dayton, NV
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Quote:
Originally Posted by David Paule View Post
Had a thought about architecture of the survival kit. Might be worth having two kinds. One would be the master one that would always be in the plane but would only really suffice for the pilot. The other would be an add-on that you'd carry when you had a passenger, with appropriate consumables and other necessary things for another person.

Dave
And I’d expand on Dave’s idea with this common survival adage “If you’re not wearing it when you go down, you don’t have it!” Which translates into a survival vest with the essentials (PLB is always at the top of my list) that you wear any time you might be over inhospitable terrain. Then you can have a survival bag in the airplane with the rest of the stuff that you want. Many survival lists read like a complete expedition outfit, which is OK if you have the room/payload. But have the bare minimum essentials with you all the time.

At least, that is one common survival gear philosophy…..
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  #17  
Old 01-06-2022, 08:38 PM
mbauer mbauer is offline
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Nikiski, AK
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Default Alaska Survival Kit

Here in Alaska we have to carry required gear:

https://dot.alaska.gov/stwdav/akfly.shtml this page lists what is required.

"Alaska Statute 02.35.110i Emergency Rations & Equipment Exit Site requires that an airman may not make a flight inside the state with an aircraft unless emergency equipment is carried as follows:

The minimum equipment during the summers months is: food for each occupant for one week; one axe or hatchet; one first aid kit; an assortment of fishing tackle such as hooks, flies, and sinkers; one knife; fire starter; one mosquito headnet for each occupant; and two signaling devices such as colored smoke bombs, pistol shells, etc. sealed in metal containers.
In addition to the above, the following must be carried as minimum equipment from October 15 to April 1 of each year: one pair of snowshoes; one sleeping bag; one wool blanket for each occupant over four."

A very good starting point. They removed the requirement for a weapon, instead a 24" handle on a hatchet or axe will work.

Mine accidently fouled at KPSC when trying to close the canopy, had to change its location after that.

Learned in a class that the most important thing to have is a signal device.

One thing learned years ago: You have a hand controlled pyrotechnic signal device, you say pistol flare gun in Canada: get ready for a very serious look and conversation.

In my kit:
Snares
Water purification tablets (iodine)
Water Purification Filter
Gill net
Signal mirrors
Flare gun
Waterproof/Windproof matches
Flint
Magnesium Fire starter
5-different kinds of fire starter plus the two above
Duct tape
Visqueen 10ftx10ft rolled real small
100ft of 1/4 braided nylon rope
Fishing gear to include an ice fishing pole (small lightweight)
Plenty of lures I know work in Alaska
Bear Spray
Wyoming Saw
8" folding saw (broken arm some of my other saws won't work-hoping this one will)
Dimond grit Finger saw (also doubles as a snare)
Hand operated chainsaw chain (Daughter bought this for my last birthday-it cuts fast)

I have more. The big thing is it isn't in one waterproof bag.

I have different size backpacks that can be easy to grab vs., one big one. Each of those backpacks has a little bit of everything. The one big is a waterproof bag with tent and sleeping bag, plus big 1st aid kit instead of the small ones in the backpacks.

Lots of Mosquito repellant (100% Deet: anything else doesn't work up here) Good headnet with ring that keeps net off of body parts. Some are just a net. these can collapse onto your neck and the Alaska State Bird learned real quick how to get food through the big openings in the net. It's bad enough with the dark cloud hovering around your head with a very hungry sounding buzz.

Usually fly with 48lbs of survival gear/tools. Weighed as things change.


I purchased a military survival vest from eBay. It has plenty of pockets to fill. Where my Sporty's handheld radio is. The ARMY helicopter version is the best.

For the food, used to carry Mountain House. Not any more. I made some Hardtack. Plenty of recipes on the net. I chose the one that uses oats. In the process of making a batch of pemmican, finally found a source locally for the grass fed beef tallow needed. With this tallow, pemmican supplies 100% of human daily requirements. It tastes bad for a reason, it is true survival food. Vacuum bagging on the hardtack will keep for 50-years. All of my survival food now weighs less and takes up less room than the mountain house I used to carry.

A final thing I did: Took an elective class when getting my AA Degree from the UAA (University of Alaska Anchorage)-Wilderness First Responder, this training was very impressive. Once certified-you can do some things in the Wilderness that paramedics can't do in a town.

Mike
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Last edited by mbauer : 01-06-2022 at 09:19 PM. Reason: Vest Food Training
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  #18  
Old 01-06-2022, 11:03 PM
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donaziza donaziza is offline
 
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And I’d expand on Dave’s idea with this common survival adage “If you’re not wearing it when you go down, you don’t have it!”

This is from post 16, Ironflight. Paul, (or anyone else), do you know if one can buy an already made "airplane" survival vest?? Or is it something you make on your own. Yeah, I agree, if it ain't on you, you are probably not going to have access to it. I'm "always" over the north Georgia mountains. Had a friend crash and get killed there about 10 years ago.
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  #19  
Old 01-07-2022, 08:52 AM
David Paule David Paule is offline
 
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Location: Boulder, CO
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I have a fishing vest that I put things into and sometimes use. But I don't use it much since it's fairly bulky, especially if I have any survival water containers in it. In fact I wonder how hard it would be to get out of a wrecked plane with it on. Something to consider....

There's got to be a happy balance (I haven't achieved that yet), but on the other hand, there's got to be the right equipment for where you'll be flying.

Dave
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  #20  
Old 01-07-2022, 10:09 AM
swjohnsey swjohnsey is online now
 
Join Date: Nov 2018
Location: Kingsville, TX
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In a former life I was a SERE instructor, went to the SERE instructor course at Fort Bragg in '82 while Nick Rowe was commandant. You need a good knife, a couple of ways to make a fire. Bic lighters are cheap and effective but don't work when wet but will work again once dried out. Life boat matches and vaseline soaked cotton balls make a good second source. The crashed plane will likely be a good source of shelter and other useful stuff. Paracord can make lots of useful stuff like fishing line from the guts. A few small fish hooks can come in handy. Food is way down on the list of priorities as most folk can last a month or more with no food. Water! A little to get you started like a quart plus a way to treat and store it. Military water purification tables (iodine) and regular household bleach both work. Put the bleach in one of the little plasic food coloring bottles that will give you a really tough container plus a means of measuring drops. Platypus makes some nice folding bladders for storing/treating water. Space blanket. Compass. Signal mirror. Put it all in a small backpack. Dry Ducks make lightweight rain gear/ponchos that is cheap and light. The poncho is probably the most versitile.

We carried a SERE kit on our person, small enough to fit in a pocket. Mine was in a taped up Sucrets container. Mine had a small knife, Gerber LST mini, small Bic, button compass, bone saw, Lomotil, water purification tablets. Braided fishing line and a couple of very small hooks.

Look at what the military puts in their aircraft survival packs. Military pilots generally don't have a broke airplane to work with.
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