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  #31  
Old 01-04-2022, 03:59 PM
John Tierney John Tierney is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vonore, TN
Posts: 559
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Back in Navy flight school in the 1980's, the bail out procedure for the T-34 was to stand/squat on the seat then dive for the wing, in order to avoid the tail surfaces. Presumably you would never touch the wing, because as soon as you got in the slipstream you would be blown backwards. This video shows a tumbling technique.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ODqG2MLCEQ
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  #32  
Old 01-04-2022, 05:51 PM
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mfleming mfleming is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2016
Location: Joseph, Oregon
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I think I read all the posts but if someone mentioned this already, my apologies.

As a former skydiver, I think I can say that most people who have never jumped out of an airplane, would need something catastrophically going wrong to motivate them to jump.
People that have not jumped before.... even at night over lousy terrain, would find it very hard to abandoned the aircraft...no matter what they thought while running through scenarios in their armchair. (Sean Tucker is not most people)

So that leaves us trying to exit a RV that is:
  • On fire
  • Lost a major piece of the aircraft
  • and/or out of control

Very difficult to do without a clear plan.
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  #33  
Old 01-04-2022, 11:18 PM
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donaziza donaziza is offline
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 875
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I was gonna buy a chute for in my 8, (actually, I had had one a few years back) but here's what stopped me. (I know, I know what y'all are going to say--redo my panel) I have a Garmin 496 mounted in one of those Air Gizmo mounts. Also have a tablet mounted on a Ram Mount. Found I couldn't get my knees past those 2 items. SO--I even took out my backrest cushion, with just my back against the metal backrest. Still can't get my knees past. And I'm not tall, just 5' 10". Just sayin----practice where your knees are. Ok, refer to the I know, I know part above
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  #34  
Old 01-05-2022, 07:52 AM
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Snowflake Snowflake is offline
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Sidney, BC, Canada
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agent4573 View Post
I think Bob is the only one that mentioned running the trim forward, and I think that would be my technique. I put the quick pull pins in my canopy and in my mind, I would pull the pins, run the trim forward, release the canopy and bail. ... Running the trim forward seems to be the best way to get constant pitch down, and then it doesn't really matter if you're upright or inverted.
Okay, so with that in mind, you have the plane trimmed nose-down, roll inverted, and move to get out, and as you leave the plane, the nose-down trim swings the tail into the space you're now occupying... Why is this better than stepping over the side of the cockpit and diving into the space between the wing and the tail?

Serious question, I really don't know what would happen here. It just seems that a momentary negative-G to get you out would be better, as the plane wouldn't continue moving into a space that you're going to (briefly) occupy.
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  #35  
Old 01-05-2022, 01:00 PM
agent4573 agent4573 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Mountain view
Posts: 487
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
Okay, so with that in mind, you have the plane trimmed nose-down, roll inverted, and move to get out, and as you leave the plane, the nose-down trim swings the tail into the space you're now occupying... Why is this better than stepping over the side of the cockpit and diving into the space between the wing and the tail?

Serious question, I really don't know what would happen here. It just seems that a momentary negative-G to get you out would be better, as the plane wouldn't continue moving into a space that you're going to (briefly) occupy.
Personally, I wouldn't roll inverted, I would just trim nose down and leave the plane. If you trim for -1g and let go of the stick, it will stabilize at a negative AoA, likely before you're able to release your belt and get out. This means the tail isn't swinging anywhere, you're in a stabilized flight condition. I realize that the tail will move "up" in relation to the cockpit while it settles in its new stabilized AoA, but for every inch the tail moves up, the AoA decreases and the aircraft as a whole will be accelerated away from things not attached to it. Without doing the CFD I can't say for sure how it would react, but personal belief is that the -Nz would be a much greater influence on distance between you and the tail than the momentary pitch rate would be. Could be wrong though.
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