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  #1  
Old 10-18-2021, 11:02 AM
dwollen89 dwollen89 is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2020
Location: Austin, MN
Posts: 13
Default Building in Cold Weather

Good morning all! Iím just starting my build on an RV 7a. Iím wondering about building in the cold weather. My shop is a two stall garage attached to my house. Itís insulated and heated with a torpedo heater. I live in MN, which is cold on a whole new level. I donít have the ability to heat my garage 24/7, so I plan to warm it up just prior to working in there. Does anyone see any issues with this as the aluminum will be getting warmed up and cooled down multiple times a week? My concerns are 1) condensation forming on the metal and 2) metal expanding and contracting repeatedly. To address the condensation issue, Iím considering using Corrosion X on occasion during the build. Any thoughts or experience with these issues? Thanks!
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  #2  
Old 10-18-2021, 11:15 AM
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Mel Mel is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
Posts: 11,287
Default

The continuous heating and cooling is not a problem. Just make sure that all aluminum, structure and skins are warm during riveting.

When I built my -6, it was in controlled environment and I still heated the skins additionally. Probably overkill, but my skins cam out drum tight. At the same time another gentleman just a mile or 2 from me riveted his skins in a cold garage (not cold by your standards) and his skins were VERY loose and wrinkled.
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EAA Flight Advisor/Tech Counselor, Friend of the RV-1
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USAF Vet, High School E-LSA Project Mentor.
RV-6 Flying since 1993 (sold)
<rvmel(at)icloud.com>
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  #3  
Old 10-18-2021, 11:33 AM
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Mike S Mike S is offline
Senior Curmudgeon
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: Dayton Airpark, NV A34
Posts: 16,182
Default

Torpedo heaters can cause CO issues.
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Mike Starkey
VAF 909

Rv-10, N210LM.

Flying as of 12/4/2010

Phase 1 done, 2/4/2011

Sold after 240+ wonderful hours of flight.

"Flying the airplane is more important than radioing your plight to a person on the ground incapable of understanding or doing anything about it."
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  #4  
Old 10-18-2021, 11:41 AM
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Mel Mel is offline
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Dallas area
Posts: 11,287
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike S View Post
Torpedo heaters can cause CO issues.
Ventilation...Ventilation...Ventilation!
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Mel Asberry, DAR since the last century. Over 1,000 certifications accomplished. Discount for Veterans, Law Enforcement, Fire Fighters.
EAA Flight Advisor/Tech Counselor, Friend of the RV-1
Recipient of Tony Bingelis Award and Wright Brothers Master Pilot Award
USAF Vet, High School E-LSA Project Mentor.
RV-6 Flying since 1993 (sold)
<rvmel(at)icloud.com>
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  #5  
Old 10-18-2021, 11:46 AM
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sbal0906 sbal0906 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 221
Default

Something to consider is your tools will be cold soaked. Maybe your pre-heat will be enough but holding a cold bucking bar in your bare hand is not pleasant!

Also, condensation will form on your tools as well.

My garage isn't heated so I take a break from building over the winter. Slow build indeed.

Cheers,
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RV-9A
Working on wing - fuel tanks.
Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
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  #6  
Old 10-18-2021, 11:55 AM
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Steve Melton Steve Melton is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Cincinnati, OH
Posts: 3,602
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yeah, those cold tools eventually wear you down. when it's was cold, late and feeling fatigued, I found myself wondering "why am I doing this".

feeling beaten down in this photo 10 years ago. since then, it's become much better. when you feel like I did, take a photo of yourself.

one thing I wish I would have done earlier is to add better lighting. my lights were not very bright and the cold temps made them even worse. I think working in dim lighting adversely affects my mood. even the day I threw acetone in my face was better than this day.

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Cincinnati, OH
RV-9A, Tip-up, Superior O-320, roller lifters, 160HP, WW 200RV, dual impulse slick mags, oil pressure = 65 psi, EGT = 1300F, flight hours = 900+ for all

Simplicity is the art in design.
I was born an airplane nut. I have no explanation for it.
My Artwork is freely given and published and cannot be patented.
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Last edited by Steve Melton : 10-18-2021 at 12:26 PM.
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  #7  
Old 10-18-2021, 12:08 PM
rongawer rongawer is offline
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Brentwood, CA
Posts: 803
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dwollen89 View Post
Good morning all! I’m just starting my build on an RV 7a. I’m wondering about building in the cold weather. My shop is a two stall garage attached to my house. It’s insulated and heated with a torpedo heater. I live in MN, which is cold on a whole new level. I don’t have the ability to heat my garage 24/7, so I plan to warm it up just prior to working in there. Does anyone see any issues with this as the aluminum will be getting warmed up and cooled down multiple times a week? My concerns are 1) condensation forming on the metal and 2) metal expanding and contracting repeatedly. To address the condensation issue, I’m considering using Corrosion X on occasion during the build. Any thoughts or experience with these issues? Thanks!
Aside from working in the cold with cold tools, your consideration of Corrosion X is interesting. To be certain, I am an advocate of C-X and the sacrificial anode it provides in the galvanic action of corrosion, and I think wiping down your idle parts once a year is fine and should be sufficient. There are couple things to consider though; first, if you're going to apply C-X to your parts, an obvious thing is remove the blue plastic first...second, C-X needs to be dried about 6 months prior to attempting to prime/paint as it settles into the metal on a molecular level and will inhibit bonding. So... if you're one of those "gotta prime everything" guys, you may want to reconsider using C-X. If you only prime the parts where dissimilar metals contact, then using MEK, or equivalent prior to priming, then letting completely dry should work as well.
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- RV10, N762G, Build in progress.
- Several others that are now just great memories for me.
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  #8  
Old 10-18-2021, 12:21 PM
Sam_B Sam_B is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Boyceville, Wi
Posts: 102
Default Moisture issues too

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike S View Post
Torpedo heaters can cause CO issues.
Torpedo heaters directly vent to the area that they are heating. Iím no chemist, so donít ask for a chemical equation, but moisture is a byproduct of combustion. If you leave it on all day for a good long work session, it may cause condensation and even a bit of rain in your garage. Years ago, I had an insulated but unheated garage in Eau Claire, Wi, so not that far from you, and I witnessed this with a torpedo heater.

Do you have an inside space you could do deburring or small projects in this winter?
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  #9  
Old 10-18-2021, 12:41 PM
John Tierney John Tierney is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Vonore, TN
Posts: 538
Default Unit Heater

I tried space heaters in my garage during my 7A slow build in southeast WI, but ended up having a Reznor unit heater (propane) installed near the ceiling, vented thru the roof. Several other quality unit heater companies, including Modine. Mine had a simple wall mounted thermostat. I needed a box fan on the floor near the garage door, aimed at the ceiling to circulate the heat, which liked to stay on the ceiling.

In my unheated WI hangar, while working on the engine install, there were times where I had a propane torpedo heater at my back, and a radiant electric heater on my front, but as other pointed out, the tools and aircraft/engine parts just don't warm up, so your hands and fingers take a beating.
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Vonore, TN
RV-7A - N777JT Flying
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  #10  
Old 10-18-2021, 12:46 PM
fixnflyguy fixnflyguy is offline
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Winston-Salem, N.C.
Posts: 1,488
Default Dehumidifier

I took over 15 years to build my -4, some in a basement, some in garage, some in hangar. I always ran a portable de-humidifer on MAX. Never a corrosion issue. I also work in heavy aircraft overhaul, which is seldom in controlled environment. I am not a fan of using any corrosion-X or similar product during builds, as you will risk having bleed-out in paint and any other finishes you apply if it gets in the wrong spots and you don't get it clean . The de-humidifier saves plane parts, and tools as well. The wick type Kero heaters will be much cleaner and tolerable than a torpedo..add a few old-school quartz lights and you will be warm enough I think. The torpedo will depress you in short order.
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RV-4/N76WE
8A7 / Advance NC
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