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  #1  
Old 05-25-2022, 06:46 PM
Vans101 Vans101 is offline
 
Join Date: Apr 2016
Location: Arizona
Posts: 115
Default Spark Plug "Antisiez"??

Hey there,

I have Lightspeed Plasma III ignition systems that use automotive spark plugs so the installation needs and adapter to size down from the airplane sized plug to the automotive plugs.

I have been using the aluminum colored anti-sieze lubricant on my spark plug threads however I am not too happy with the results.

After running the engine for 30 hours or so it seems like the sparkplugs are all REALLY tight and super hard to get out and they make a horrible binding noise as they get unscrewed. Often times the spark plug and the adapter come out together so that is frustrating.

Has anyone else experienced this issue?

Got a better product to use?

WD-40?

Not use anything and just brush the threads?

THANKS for the advice!!!
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  #2  
Old 05-25-2022, 06:53 PM
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DanH DanH is offline
 
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Use a copper-based anti-seize. See Lycoming Service Instruction 1042AH.
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  #3  
Old 05-25-2022, 09:07 PM
YellowJacket RV9 YellowJacket RV9 is offline
 
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Location: Clearwater, FL KCLW
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanH View Post
Use a copper-based anti-seize. See Lycoming Service Instruction 1042AH.
Yep this is the stuff:
https://www.aircraftspruce.com/catal...eizecopper.php
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RV-9A - Done(ish) 4/5/16! Flying 4/7/16
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  #4  
Old 05-25-2022, 10:07 PM
Vans101 Vans101 is offline
 
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Location: Arizona
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THANKS!!!

Bill
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  #5  
Old 05-26-2022, 12:08 AM
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rv8ch rv8ch is offline
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: LSGY
Posts: 4,773
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NGK says to put them on dry.

https://ngksparkplugs.com/en/resourc...ut-spark-plugs

Quote:
5 THINGS YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT SPARK PLUGS

1. Anti-seize

NGK spark plugs feature trivalent plating. This silver or chrome-colored finish on the threads is designed to provide corrosion resistance against moisture and chemicals. The coating also acts as a release agent during spark plug removal. NGK spark plugs are installed at the factory dry, without lubrication or anti-seize.

Anti-seize can act as a lubricant, altering torque values up to 20 percent, increasing the risk of spark plug thread breakage and/or metal shell stretch. Thread breakage can sometimes involve removing the cylinder head for repair. Metal shell stretch changes the heat rating of the spark plug and can result in serious engine damage caused by pre-ignition. Do not use anti-seize or lubricant on NGK spark plugs. It is completely unnecessary and can be detrimental.

2. Corona stain

Corona stain is a light brown or tan discoloration on the outside of the ceramic insulator above the metal shell/hex. Corona stain is created by the high voltage traveling thru the plug that attracts the dirt or oil particles surrounding the exposed ceramic insulator between the wire/coil boot and spark plug metal shell. Corona stain is completely normal and should not be mistaken for exhaust gas blow-by or a broken seal inside the spark plug.

3. Gapping fine-wire spark plugs

While most NGK spark plugs are pre-gapped, there are occasions when the gap requires adjustment. Care must be taken to avoid bending or breaking off the fine-wire electrodes. NGK recommends a round wire-style or pin gauge gap tool to measure the gap. If the gap must be adjusted, use a tool that only moves the ground electrode and does not pry between or against the electrodes. NGK also recommends adjusting the gap no more than +/- 0.008” from the factory preset gap.

4. Torque

Torque is crucial in the ability of the plug to dissipate heat and perform properly. Always follow the manufacturer recommended torque specification. An under-torqued spark plug can lead to excessive vibration and improper heat dissipation, causing spark plug and/or engine damage. Over torquing may cause any of the following: thread damage/breakage, compromised internal seals leading to gas leakage, metal shell stretch leading to poor heat dissipation and pre-ignition.

5.“Copper spark plugs”

“Copper spark plugs” is a term often used to describe a standard material spark plug. However, this terminology is incorrect, as standard material plugs do not have electrodes made from copper. Copper is soft with a low melting point and cannot be used for electrodes, as they would wear very quickly. A standard material spark plug uses a nickel-alloy that may include a small copper core. The copper core has nothing to do with the electrical performance of the spark plug. A copper core is used to increase heat dissipation and durability by lowering the electrode temperatures. Nearly all NGK spark plugs, including precious metal iridium and platinum plugs, have a copper core to increase the electrode durability. Special nickel alloys, platinum, and iridium electrodes, along with copper cores are all used to enhance durability – durability meaning how long a spark plug will last before it needs to be replaced.
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  #6  
Old 05-26-2022, 04:45 AM
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DanH DanH is offline
 
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It's a good point Mickey. As usual, there can be conflicting information. This from the OP's Lightspeed manual:

• Install adaptors in cylinder head using the supplied copper washer. Torque to 35 - 45 ft-lbs using anti-seize compound.
• Install automotive style spark plugs with their washer. Torque to 20 ft-lbs using anti-seize compound.


Rotax specifies heat sink compound on plug threads.

The Whizzer scooter manual specified weasel grease.

(Ok, I made up the last one.)

Vans 101, what procedure are you using?
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Last edited by DanH : 05-26-2022 at 08:36 AM.
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  #7  
Old 05-26-2022, 08:28 AM
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jcarne jcarne is offline
 
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I have been using nickel based anti-seize with good results. Engine oil alone didn't do anything for me, removing those plugs was not fun. Have thought about seeing how copper works though as that is the one recommended.
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  #8  
Old 05-26-2022, 10:02 AM
BillL BillL is offline
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Central IL
Posts: 6,655
Default Antiseize aside . . .

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vans101 View Post
After running the engine for 30 hours or so it seems like the sparkplugs are all REALLY tight and super hard to get out and they make a horrible binding noise as they get unscrewed. Often times the spark plug and the adapter come out together so that is frustrating.
Do you chase the plug thread bore at every removal?

I have been doing this for a few decades as the combustion pressures pulse in/out of the thread cavities and allow carbon to form in there. This builds until the plugs stick. The tool is a Lisle 20200 thread chaser. If it is an odd size filing some grooves in a removed plug will serve as a throwaway tool.

I do this w or w/o anti-seize. I concur on copper type for spark plugs.
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  #9  
Old 05-26-2022, 10:33 AM
gasman gasman is offline
 
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Location: Sonoma County
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanH View Post
It's a good point Mickey. As usual, there can be conflicting information. This from the OP's Lightspeed manual:

• Install adaptors in cylinder head using the supplied copper washer. Torque to 35 - 45 ft-lbs using anti-seize compound.
• Install automotive style spark plugs with their washer. Torque to 20 ft-lbs using anti-seize compound.


Rotax specifies heat sink compound on plug threads.

The Whizzer scooter manual specified weasel grease.

(Ok, I made up the last one.)

Vans 101, what procedure are you using?
True.... But NGK is not the recommended plug for LSI.
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  #10  
Old 05-26-2022, 10:56 AM
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DanH DanH is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gasman View Post
True.... But NGK is not the recommended plug for LSI.
Tell it to Mickey, not me. I like weasel grease on my IKH27's
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