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  #31  
Old 09-06-2021, 09:57 PM
agent4573 agent4573 is offline
 
Join Date: Aug 2019
Location: Mountain view
Posts: 373
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The oil cooler door was interesting to install as well. It didn't fit as well as I would have hoped (seems to be a common theme for all things airplane). The hole alignment meant that I would have had to figure 8/snowman a few of the rivets that held the reinforcement plate on to the back of the baffle. The inside one, I was ok with this, but the outer rivet was one of 5 that held the rear baffle to the side baffle, and I didn't want to risk opening up the hole like that. I sanded the outside bearing block until it was skinnier, and then installed it on the inside of the baffle instead of the outside. The inner bearing block, I just connected the two holes and moved on. It's not a super important rivet there and it got replaced with a 10-32 screw, so its not like i lost it completely.

Once that was in place, I made up a mount for the TCM servo arm that I got for the oil cooler door. I have a knob on my panel that just says "oil cooler - <-Colder Hotter->". So I verified that the servo got shorter when I turned the knob to colder and then fabbed up a quick little mount to hold it in place. Works great on the ground, so we'll see how it holds up once we start flying. I couldn't find a castle nut for #8 screws, so I double-nutted it so it could still move and drilled a hole in the threads for a cotter pin. If the nuts do come loose, they won't be able to fall off. After that we spent a ton of time trimming up the duct and installed that on the oil cooler. The oil cooler is a very tight fit to the frame, and the rubber channel that rides along the back of the baffle had to be held in place with some tape while we used a little black RTV to hold it exactly where it needed to be. Once the RTV dried I pulled the tape.

We also took about 30 minutes to trim and glue up the neoprene that makes up the transition between the inlet rings and the plenum.
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Last edited by agent4573 : 09-06-2021 at 10:31 PM.
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  #32  
Old 09-06-2021, 10:19 PM
agent4573 agent4573 is offline
 
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And now, the last thing we did with the Sam James stuff was to fit the engine air intake and air filter. I first fit up the entire thing with the standard mounting plate that Sam James provides. In order to attach this to the 2.5" round flange that's on the SDS throttle body, you need an adapter. I ended up trying a few things. I called up SDS and got a set of machined adapter plates they use for a different motor. This is a flat plate with 4 holes that would bolt to the rear of the filter housing, and it had a 2.5" flange on it. The bolt holes were a little wide, and the outlet of the Sam James "transit duct" that's inside of the filter housing is way larger than 2.5".

Next I tried a cheap MAF adapter from amazon. This has 8 bolt holes in a universal pattern and a 3" outlet flange. This actually bolted up very nicely and was the right size to match up to the James transition duct. The downsides were 1) It was heavy, and 2) it made the intake very long. After the 3" outlet I had to use a 3" to 2.5" silicone coupler and by the time everything was installed, I only had less than 1" of gap between the inlet ring and the filter housing. I would have kept this option, until Mona at Sam James called me back and said they make a housing with a built-in flange.

This was similar to the option above, but it saved a lot of weight and ended up being 1/2" shorter overall. Along with this, trimming the silicone coupler as short as possible, plus a little trimming on the front side of the housing, there's now plenty of gap for wiggle at startup and shutdown.

I did a spring loaded alternate air door to get rid of one more cable in the cabin. After fitting and trimming the door, I coated the aluminum with some bearing grease and applied high temp gasket maker to make a great fit. I also greased one side of the hinge and laid a bead of gasket maker along the other side of the seam. After the gasket make cures, it takes a little effort to release from the greased side, but it eventually does. There were some large gaps around the spring and hinge and this covers 99% of them and doesn't stop the door from opening. It is ugly though.

Since I don't have any way to know when the filter is iced over, I made a little mount for a micro switch. I'll wire this into the G3x and have it give a red warning when the alt air door opens. Since I don't have positive retention to keep the door closed, I made sure to install it facing down/sideways. This way 6g's won't try to open the door and give me a red warning in the middle of a turn or loop. I bought a few different strength springs for the hinge. I put in the one that felt right, but if the door has a bunch of unintentional openings in flight, I can always swap the spring for a stiffer one.

After all this, we started on the gear leg fairings. I was hoping to get them aligned and get the wheels pants and transitions on the plane this weekend. You never get as much done as you're hoping to though. We drilled the hinge into both gear leg fairings and did the initial trimming. The passenger side went great, but we messed up the hinge on the pilot side and had to start again. We didn't get the first 2-3 holes exactly right, and it changed the angle the hinge wanted to sit at naturally. I mixed up some flox and epoxy and filled the holes from our first attempt. After 4 hours in the sun, the flox was good to sand and we succeeded with attempt #2. The instructions recommend the magnet/washer method for drilling holes through opaque fiberglass, but I just made up a strap doubler. We pre-drilled the hinge and used the strap doubler to locate all the holes on the outside of the fairing. I held the strap doubler in place while Kacy used the drill to chase the holes. Almost 100 holes later and she only hit my finger once. No blood though, so we're good.

Coming in a few weeks: wheel pants and intersection fairings. it the last fiberglass I have to do..... except for wing tips.
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Last edited by agent4573 : 09-06-2021 at 10:42 PM.
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  #33  
Old 09-20-2021, 06:47 PM
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Davea320 Davea320 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by agent4573 View Post
Laid out the rivet locations for the Titanium belly skin. It an 20x24" piece of 0.020 Ti bought from Mcmaster. It has 1/8" of Fiberfrax sandwiched between it and the primered skin. I made 2 drain slots on the rear of it for any water to drain out, but it sits so well against the belly skin that I'm not planning on sealing the edges or worrying about water ingress.
Ok I gotta ask, whatís the reason for the titanium belly skin?
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  #34  
Old 09-20-2021, 07:15 PM
BobTurner BobTurner is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davea320 View Post
Ok I gotta ask, whatís the reason for the titanium belly skin?
As demonstrated by inadvertent tests, in an RV-10 engine fire, the heat goes back to the SS firewall and then under the aluminum airframe, where it melts a hole up into the cockpit. The Ti skin and insulation is there to slow this down.
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  #35  
Old 09-21-2021, 10:13 AM
agent4573 agent4573 is offline
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davea320 View Post
Ok I gotta ask, whatís the reason for the titanium belly skin?
As Bob said, there has been one known incident of the floorboard becoming the problem area during an engine fire. This plane was planned to be an IAC entry level competitor from the beginning of the project, so we're doing everything we can to mitigate fire hazards. We're going to push this plane harder than the average pilot would, so we're just trying to be careful. It added about 1.5lbs but gives a lot of piece of mind.
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  #36  
Old 09-21-2021, 06:48 PM
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Davea320 Davea320 is offline
 
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Originally Posted by BobTurner View Post
As demonstrated by inadvertent tests, in an RV-10 engine fire, the heat goes back to the SS firewall and then under the aluminum airframe, where it melts a hole up into the cockpit. The Ti skin and insulation is there to slow this down.
First Iíve heard of this. Is it a common mod??
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  #37  
Old 09-22-2021, 11:40 AM
agent4573 agent4573 is offline
 
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The extra firewall protection is becoming more common, the Ti floorboard protection much less common. I think the floorboard mod is more common on RV8's that have an exhaust tunnel.

https://vansairforce.net/community/s...d.php?t=131516
https://vansairforce.net/community/s...d.php?t=154919
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